The collapse of the 2008 economy was tough on a lot of businesses and individuals, and many storefronts were closing their doors instead of opening them.

But one Triad restaurant seemed to triumph and opened their doors for the first time, potentially risking it all for the sake of chasing a dream.

“With no cash on hand, I decided to combine my wish of owning a hospitality business with my need for a change. I scavenged for building materials, went scrapping for copper and metal,” says Miro Buzov, who was forced to close his fabrication shop due to the economy.

One of two locations (the first opened in High Point in 2013), Penny Path Café & Crepe Shop in Winston-Salem offers a variety of crepes — including savory options, like The Kitchen Sink (pictured left), and sweet ones, like The French Toast. They also have a full coffee bar, all of which was inspired by Buzov’s wife and grandmother.

“I loved pan-frying crepes ever since my grandma taught me how to properly make them,” he says. “As a form of relaxation, I often cooked dozens of crepes at night or in the morning, and my three daughters loved to eat them at any time.”

After opening the High Point restaurant, the Buzov family built a solid customer base, and many guests often traveled from Winston-Salem to enjoy their one-of-a kind crepes. Upon opening the Winston-Salem location last year, they were excited to bring their crepes closer to their Twin City fans.

“I always loved the way the city developed over the years,” says Buzov, who’s a fan of Mozelle’s and Hot Dog City. “An opportunity came to lease the existing space in the Reynolda Village. It is a beautiful location, and I was fortunate to have had Wake Forest’s property management on my side. They trusted me with my vision, and helped me to make it a reality.”

The business has always been family owned and operated.

“My daughter, Mira, is now managing the Reynolda location,” he says. “I could not do it without her. I’m also thankful for our staff that is keeping the business culture I want alive. I love to serve customers and enjoy meeting the many different people that come to see us.”

Today, Miro and Mira are working on obtaining their beer and wine license with hopes of having it secured for late fall of this year. They’re also looking to incorporate more specials on the weekends, as well as possible expansion opportunities.

“We are still looking for the right creative chef who will take care of those,” Buzov says, “and we’re always looking for the right space to pop up. I am very specific about the ambience of our shops, and the location paired with the right building/space is very important.”

The hard work Buzov put into his business has paid off, but it took a long way to get there.

“In short, the meaning behind the Penny Path is it was created by walking on a path of pennies,” he says. “It was truly a labor of love.”

Want to Go?

Winston-Salem

122 Reynolda Village, 336-986-9555

High Point

104 E. MLK Jr. Drive, 336-821-2925

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