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I realize that some liberals may be having a hard time understanding why President Trump’s defense is centered on Hunter Biden, Joe Biden, Burisma and Viktor Shokin, the former prosecutor general of Ukraine.

The reason is that if there is some corruption involved, then President Trump had every right to withhold U.S. assistance until Ukraine agreed to look into it.

I realize that some conservatives are having a hard time understanding why it’s a ridiculous defense.

It’s because everyone, including congressional Republicans, understood Shokin to be corrupt. And when Joe Biden demanded he be removed before Ukraine received U.S. aid, he wasn’t acting on his own behalf, but on America’s behalf. That’s why he not only “admitted” he got Shokin fired, but bragged about it.

This is old news.

Trump said (to paraphrase), “If you want my assistance, you have to pretend you’re fighting corruption.” Biden said (to paraphrase), “If you want our assistance, you have to actually fight corruption.”

To tell the truth, I think Trump was the victim of a conspiracy theory. Rudy Giuliani told him that Ukraine was corrupt and Shokin was a good guy. Trump liked that story because it countered claims that Russia helped him win the 2016 election. He believed what he was told and now he’s been impeached because of it.

The moral of the story: Don’t believe what you’re told just because it sounds good.

Malcolm Ramsey

Winston-Salem

Holocaust remembrance

Over the past week I have been thinking about the death of NBA great Kobe Bryant and eight other people in the helicopter with him. The tragic deaths of nine people and their respective families deserve our thoughts and prayers.

Unfortunately, what has received only passing reference and news coverage was commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz concentration and extermination camp created under the Nazis during World War II that occurred at the same time as Bryant’s death.

No disrespect intended toward Bryant (the other eight are almost an afterthought); however, it is unfortunate that so little attention was/is paid to the great white supremacist experiment of the 1930s-1940s that resulted in the murder and extermination of millions of Jews, gypsies and others who did not fit the profile.

Is there little wonder that more than a generation has so little knowledge and concern for history? Is there little wonder that white supremacy is on the rise? Is there little wonder that the policies of this country are prohibiting asylum and/or immigration for non-white and non-English speaking people? Is there little wonder that so many white people in this country are afraid that they will not be the majority anymore and are striking out?

David Botchin

Winston-Salem

Judging a success

According to the writer of the Jan. 25 letter “By a landslide,” President Trump “overcame President Obama’s failed $1 trillion stimulus.”

According to a 2017 NPR Fact Check story, the stimulus was quite a success.

In part, the story reads: “the Transportation Department’s website still carries a rundown of stimulus projects, saying that the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ‘initiated more than 13,000 projects through the Federal Highway Administration, improving more than 42,000 miles of road and more than 2,700 bridges.’ … $40 billion went to unemployment insurance, along with $25 billion to COBRA health coverage and $20.9 billion to SNAP (sometimes referred to as food stamps), according to The New York Times’ rundown of stimulus spending, and there were plenty of other, smaller ‘social programs’ as well.

“There was plenty of other spending in the bill: more than $200 billion in tax cuts for individuals, for example, and more than $120 billion in education and job training-related programs, according to the Times’ tally. There were also $48 billion in transportation projects, along with another $32 billion in other infrastructure projects.”

Maybe the letter writer’s inability to judge a success is why he thinks Trump is one.

Howard Fount

Winston-Salem

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