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Trump’s conspiracy

The writer of the June 4 letter, “Responsible adults,” is concerned about people who “spend their lives obsessing” over President Trump’s “every idle utterance.” The problem is that, while Trump’s every idle utterance is so full of distortion and dishonesty, they are also so influential among his cult. Those of us who want our country to make decisions based on rationality and morality, rather than the president’s random ill temper and ignorance, revealed daily, have to pay attention as a matter of self-defense.

The latest Trumpian conspiracy being lapped up by his followers is that two FBI agents who idly wrote disparaging texts about him — like millions of Americans have done — somehow reveal an attempted coup whose co-conspirators included the press, the Democratic Party (which was, naturally, opposed to his election anyway), the FBI, the CIA, the Russians, the Republican establishment, the “deep state” and probably the Avengers. Somehow, his extremely stable genius prevailed against all of these united forces. What a story.

One mustn’t look too closely, though, or one sees the obvious flaws. Like the blow dealt to Hillary Clinton by then-FBI director James Comey raising her email issues right before the election. Like Russia’s failure to produce anything, during the election, to make Trump look bad; only information to make Clinton look bad.

And one must also explain why, when so much of what the president says is wrong, this absurd theory is the one thing that he should get right.

Perry Mitchell

Winston-Salem

Behind the scenes

I was pleased to hear that President Trump has authorized the release of classified documents related to the Russian probe so that Attorney General William Barr could investigate the true origins of the probe into Trump’s election campaign (“Critics wary of intelligence probe,” May 25). I suspect we’re going to see some surprises before it’s all over. There’s nothing like investigating the investigators.

I keep hearing there’s no evidence that the FBI or the Obama administration spied on President Trump’s campaign. Why not have an investigation to see if there was? Why are the Democrats afraid of that?

Special counsel Robert Mueller says that charging Trump with a crime “just wasn’t an option.” I don’t buy it. If he thought Trump had committed a crime, he could have said so. He could have made his reputation as the man who saved America. Instead, he’s slinking off to retirement with a whimper.

“Barr is a staunch Trump defender,” the AP story says, as if there’s something wrong with that. Would his sincerity be questioned if he agreed with the Democrats? Is he really supposed to act hostile to Trump just to prove he’s independent?

Let’s open all the secret files and air everything out. Let the American people see what’s really going on behind the scenes.

Eric Murdoch

Winston-Salem

Innocent animals

I’m probably like a lot of people in that I got very angry when I read about the couple who let the nine alpacas and a goat starve to death (“Alpaca deaths lead to charges,” June 4). I can’t understand how someone can let innocent animals suffer that way. And I’m trying to think of what, if anything, would excuse or even explain their behavior.

Were drugs involved? Did the couple feel they had nowhere to turn?

According to your story, alpacas don’t often show signs of illness because they are herd animals and they try to look strong for the herd.

But thank goodness the deputy who went to investigate found other dead animals that clued him in. Didn’t the couple know the alpacas were in danger, too?

The charges are for “intentional deprivation of necessary sustenance.” If they’re found guilty, they should go to prison for a long, long time and be denied the opportunity to ever own animals again.

Joan S. Byrne

Kernersville

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