What ‘Dixie’ means

I am writing about the changing of the Dixie Classic Fair name (“Fair to get new name,” Aug. 20). Does it matter what “Dixie” means to white people? I am proud to live in Dixieland and those who aren’t should move.

If the name changes, I have attended my last fair in Winston-Salem.

D.D. Moore

Lawsonville

The true owners

I have given this a lot of thought and it seems to me all those who are lambasting and spending their time hating immigrants should just keep quiet, unless they themselves are American Indians.

After all, American Indians are the true owners of this country. But others’ ancestors came here, stole their land, burned their homes and murdered them.

So all of the hate-mongers should spend the rest of their lives making amends to the Indians of this country, if they are truly interested in justice.

Nancy Benedict

Winston-Salem

Two reasons

Two of the reasons stated in the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States “in Order to form a more perfect Union” are to “insure domestic Tranquility” and “promote the general Welfare.” The Second Amendment of the Constitution reads, “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

Surely, interpretations of the Second Amendment should be consistent with the two reasons stated above from the Preamble.

Thorough background checks on all people desiring to purchase firearms and denial of personal ownership of military types of guns should be interpreted as consistent with both the Second Amendment and the aforementioned statements from the Preamble.

During much of the history of the United States, the courts have upheld sensible gun laws. Only comparatively recently have they been framed as violating the Constitution.

Sensible laws controlling ownership and use of guns based on comparative international analyses substantially reduce deaths from guns (suicides, accidental deaths, deaths from domestic violence and mass killings of people).

The CNN show “Fareed Zakaria GPS” on Aug. 11 contained much relevant and detailed material.

Avery G. Church

Clemmons

A sad development

It’s sad that the name of the Dixie Classic Fair has to be changed for the sake of political correctness. I was born and raised in “Dixie,” i.e., south of the Mason/Dixon Line, and never have thought of the name as having a racial connotation.

James C. Eller

Winston-Salem

Stunning

Wow, what if President Obama had called himself “the Chosen One,” or had embraced the moniker of “the King of Israel?”

What if he had paid off a porn star right before he had been elected and then lied about it? What if he had called his detractors “ugly,” “nasty” or having “low IQ?”

Here’s what would have happened: Conservative Christians would have rushed to “condemn his sins.” Instead, it’s crickets from that group of people after President Trump has done these very things. I guess it’s because Trump speaks of “Two Corinthians” and signs Bibles and that’s “religious enough” for them. The hypocrisy is stunning.

Eddie Waddell

Winston-Salem

Worth fighting

As a proud son of the redneck South, I say: Our local fair (and its funnel cakes and Tilt-A-Whirl) are in no way related to my ancestral heritage. So let’s call it “Piedmont Classic Fair” and be done with it. Let our representatives focus on fixing some potholes.

Even Gen. Robert E. Lee knew which battles were worth fighting.

Mark Stafford

Winston-Salem

New name for the fair

With the change in the name of the Dixie Classic Fair there will be considerable expense in replacing signs, repainting the name on walls, etc.

I have a suggestion for the name: The Pixie Classic Fair. This way they will only have to mark over one letter, and not do all the replacing and repainting.

Linwood Davis

Winston-Salem

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