Updated 11:32 p.m.

Hurricane Dorian made landfall along the North Carolina coast late Thursday night after leaving a trail of damage and flooding from its journey up along South Carolina.

Dorian was “brushing” North Carolina’s coast, the National Hurricane Center said in its 11 p.m. update.

Although Dorian continued to lose strength Thursday night, it remained a Category 2 hurricane with sustained wind speeds of 100 mph, according to the hurricane center.

The storm is picking up speed as it approaches North Carolina, traveling northeast at 13 mph, the hurricane center reported.

The eye of the storm was about 35 miles south of Wilmington, and 70 miles out of Cape Lookout as of 11 p.m., according to the NHC.

There was hope Dorian’s eye would not make a direct hit on land. At 9 p.m., National Weather Service meteorologist Jordan Baker said, “It’s going to be close, but it might push far enough east not to make landfall.”

While Dorian is already affecting North Carolina, its impact from its time along the South Carolina coast is clear.

More than 230,000 power outages were reported by coastal South Carolina customers Thursday, and most were in the Charleston area, where more than 120,000 people had lost power.

Dozens of roads were flooded, and watches and warnings for tornadoes, flash floods and storm surge were growing north of Myrtle Beach into North Carolina.

A 98 mph wind gust was recorded on the South Carolina coast at 3 p.m., according to the hurricane center.

Flash flooding and storm surges remain the greatest threats caused by Dorian, the hurricane center tweeted.

As the storm continued to trek north, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster lifted his evacuation order for Jasper, Beaufort and Colleton counties, areas of the Lowcountry that the storm had passed.

Evacuation orders were still in effect for Charleston, Dorchester, Berkeley, Georgetown, and Horry counties, as Dorian was forecast to hit the Grand Strand region.

“We are still battening down the hatches in the other five (coastal) counties, and we want everybody to be alert,” McMaster said at a news conference.

Tornadoes began to form on the northern edge of the storm just after dawn, including two reported in Horry County near Myrtle Beach, according to the Sun News.

Multiple tornadoes were also reported In North Carolina.

A waterspout ripped through Emerald Isle about 9 a.m, destroying multiple mobile homes. A tornado touched down in Brunswick County, “leaving a trail of damage approximately 10 miles long near Calabash and Sunset Beach,” according to N.C. Gov. Roy Cooper’s office.

A funnel cloud was also recorded on video about 7 a.m. in Pender County near Fire Station 18, the National Weather Service tweeted.

As the damage and flooding mounted, evening curfews were announced in multiple communities near the N.C. coast, and a daytime curfew began at noon Thursday in Southport, N.C., ”until further notice,” according to the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office.

“Conditions are deteriorating and with confirmed tornadoes in the area, it is simply not safe to be out,” Brunswick County officials said on Facebook.

Even as Dorian moves further away from South Carolina, its dangerous effects remain in its wake. Tropical storm conditions were still affecting the northern portion of the South Carolina coast, according to the hurricane center’s 8 p.m. update.

But all of the hurricane warnings along the S.C. coast were removed, according to the NWS office in Columbia.

Hurricane warnings are still in effect for the North Carolina coast.

In North Carolina, predictions of rainfall in excess of 10 inches continued to grow, with nearly all coastal counties expected to get 10 to 15 inches of rain, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Heavy rainfall is predicted to fall far from the eye of the storm, the hurricane center tweeted.

While Dorian is expected to slowly weaken in the next few days, it will continue to be a “powerful hurricane” as it moves up the Carolinas coast, according to the NHC’s 5 p.m. update.

The storm can affect areas far inland with tropical-storm-force winds that extended 220 miles out from Dorian’s eye at 11 p.m., according to the hurricane center. Hurricane force winds extended 60 miles out.

A video tweeted by Live5News reporter Paola Tristan Arruda at 1:15 a.m showed Charleston’s famous North Market Street had become a river through the historic downtown, as emergency lights flickered on buildings.

Charleston had more than 50 road closures early Thursday, many due to flooding and others due to high winds bringing down trees and power lines, according to the city’s website.

A tree crashed into a North Charleston home just before 5 a.m., but the damage could have been worse if the little boy whose room was demolished hadn’t been sleeping in another room, WCSC reported.

Just before 8 p.m., McMaster tweeted he spoke with President Donald Trump about Dorian. The governor said Trump offered “any assistance needed.”

McMaster said FEMA officials were on the ground with him as the hurricane affected South Carolina.

The president tweeted about his conversation with McMaster, as well as speaking with North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper and Georgia’s Brian Kemp.

“Just talked to Governor Roy Cooper of North Carolina as Hurricane Dorian ominously comes up the East Coast,” Trump said, adding the White House is ready to help all three states and urging followers to “BE SAFE!”

In North Carolina, mandatory evacuations were in place for barrier islands. Coastal counties near the bays, coastal rivers and sounds also called for residents to evacuate near the coast.

Dorian is expected to bring deadly storm surge, flooding and tornadoes to the coast through the day Thursday as it heads toward the Outer Banks.

Forecasters have not predicted a potential area of landfall on the Carolinas, but suggest it could cross onto land at any point.

Coastal flooding was expected to reach 4 to 8 feet above normal levels from the Savannah River in South Caroline north to Cape Lookout on the Outer Banks, the National Hurricane Center said.

“The surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves. Surge-related flooding depends on the how close the center of Dorian comes to the coast, and can vary greatly over short distances.”

The Pamlico County Sheriff’s Office said a man suffered a fatal heart attack Thursday after pulling his boat out of the water in Oriental, WTVD reported.

The man’s identity has not been made public, according to WITN.

North Carolina’s state medical examiner reported the state’s first Dorian-related death occurred Monday, when an 85-year-old Columbus County man “fell off a ladder while preparing his house for the storm.”

At least three of the 20-plus deaths attributed to the storm have involved men falling off ladders as they prepared for the storm or tried to remove trees, according to The Weather Channel. Most of the deaths occurred in the Bahamas.

Updated 10:01 p.m.

CHARLOTTE — Hurricane Dorian’s trail of destruction and flooding had it on the verge of North Carolina Thursday night, after spending the day working up the South Carolina coast.

Although Dorian continued to lose strength Thursday night, it remained a Category 2 hurricane with sustained wind speeds of 100 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center’s 8 p.m. update.

The storm was picking up speed as it approached North Carolina, traveling northeast at 10 mph, the hurricane center reported.

The eye of the storm was about 30 miles south of Cape Fear, and 60 miles out of Wilmington as of 8 p.m., according to the NHC.

“The center of Dorian will move near or over the coast of North Carolina (Thursday night) and Friday,” according to the hurricane center.

While Dorian is already affecting North Carolina, its impact from its time along the South Carolina coast is clear.

More than 230,000 power outages were reported by coastal South Carolina customers Thursday, and most were in the Charleston area, where more than 120,000 people had lost power.

Dozens of roads were flooded, and watches and warnings for tornadoes, flash floods and storm surge were growing north of Myrtle Beach into North Carolina.

A 98 mph wind gust was recorded on the South Carolina coast at 3 p.m., according to the hurricane center.

Flash flooding and storm surges remain the greatest threats caused by Dorian, the hurricane center tweeted.

As the storm continued to trek north, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster lifted his evacuation order for Jasper, Beaufort and Colleton counties, areas of the Lowcountry that the storm had passed.

Evacuation orders were still in effect for Charleston, Dorchester, Berkeley, Georgetown, and Horry counties, as Dorian was forecast to hit the Grand Strand region.

“We are still battening down the hatches in the other five (coastal) counties, and we want everybody to be alert,” McMaster said at a news conference.

Tornadoes began to form on the northern edge of the storm just after dawn, including two reported in Horry County near Myrtle Beach, according to the Sun News.

Multiple tornadoes were also reported in North Carolina.

A waterspout ripped through Emerald Isle about 9 a.m., destroying multiple mobile homes. A tornado touched down in Brunswick County, “leaving a trail of damage approximately 10 miles long near Calabash and Sunset Beach,” according to North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper’s office.

A funnel cloud was also recorded on video about 7 a.m. in Pender County near Fire Station 18, the National Weather Service tweeted.

As the damage and flooding mounted, evening curfews were announced in multiple communities near the North Carolina coast, and a daytime curfew began at noon Thursday in Southport, N.C., “until further notice,” according to the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office.

“Conditions are deteriorating and with confirmed tornadoes in the area, it is simply not safe to be out,” Brunswick County officials said on Facebook.

Even as Dorian moves farther away from South Carolina, its dangerous effects remain in its wake. Tropical storm conditions were still affecting the northern portion of the South Carolina coast, according to the hurricane center’s 8 p.m. update.

But most of the hurricane warnings along the South Carolina coast have been reduced to tropical storm warnings, and some other warnings have been removed entirely south of Edisto Beach, according to the NHC.

Hurricane warnings are still in effect for the North Carolina coast.

In North Carolina, predictions of rainfall in excess of 10 inches continued to grow, with nearly all coastal counties expected to get 10 to 15 inches of rain, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Heavy rainfall is predicted to fall far from the eye of the storm, the hurricane center tweeted.

While Dorian is expected to slowly weaken in the next few days, it will continue to be a “powerful hurricane” as it moves up the Carolinas coast, according to the NHC’s 5 p.m. update.

Even if it never makes landfall, the storm can affect areas far inland with tropical-storm-force winds that extended 220 miles out from Dorian’s eye at 5 p.m., according to the hurricane center. Hurricane force winds extended 60 miles out.

A video tweeted by Live5News reporter Paola Tristan Arruda at 1:15 a.m. showed Charleston’s famous North Market Street had become a river through the historic downtown, as emergency lights flickered on buildings.

Charleston had more than 50 road closures early Thursday, many due to flooding and others due to high winds bringing down trees and power lines, according to the city’s website.

A tree crashed into a North Charleston home just before 5 a.m., but the damage could have been worse if the little boy whose room was demolished hadn’t been sleeping in another room, WCSC reported.

Just before 8 p.m., McMaster tweeted he spoke with President Donald Trump about Dorian. The governor said Trump offered “any assistance needed.”

McMaster said Federal Emergency Management Agency officials were on the ground with him as the hurricane affected South Carolina.

The president tweeted about his conversation with McMaster, as well as speaking with North Carolina’s Cooper and Georgia’s Brian Kemp.

“Just talked to Governor Roy Cooper of North Carolina as Hurricane Dorian ominously comes up the East Coast,” Trump said, adding the White House is ready to help all three states and urging followers to “BE SAFE!”

In North Carolina, mandatory evacuations were in place for barrier islands. Coastal counties near the bays, coastal rivers and sounds also called for residents to evacuate near the coast.

Dorian is expected to bring deadly storm surge, flooding and tornadoes to the coast through the day Thursday as it heads toward the Outer Banks.

Forecasters have not predicted a potential area of landfall on the Carolinas, but suggest it could cross onto land at any point.

Coastal flooding was expected to reach 4 to 8 feet above normal levels from the Savannah River in South Carolina north to Cape Lookout on the Outer Banks, the National Hurricane Center said.

“The surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves. Surge-related flooding depends on the how close the center of Dorian comes to the coast, and can vary greatly over short distances.”

North Carolina’s state medical examiner reported the state’s first Dorian-related death occurred Monday, when an 85-year-old Columbus County man “fell off a ladder while preparing his house for the storm.”

At least three of the 20-plus deaths attributed to the storm have involved men falling off ladders as they prepared for the storm or tried to remove trees, according to The Weather Channel. Most of the deaths occurred in the Bahamas.


Updated at 2:39 p.m.

OCRAKOKE — A North Carolina sheriff's office is reporting roofs blown off as Hurricane Dorian spins up tornadoes on its way up the coast of the Carolinas.

The Brunswick County Sheriff's Office posted photos of several houses with roofs torn off in a community known as The Farm, not far from the state line with South Carolina. Debris was also strewn through grassy areas.

Elsewhere, the sheriff's office showed images of winds that had overturned RVs and at least one boat parked on land.

The sheriff's office said there were no injuries reported.

Dorian is currently moving up the East Coast as a Category 2 hurricane. The storm devastated the Bahamas as it moved over the islands earlier this week, causing at least 20 deaths.


Updated at 1:53 p.m.

CHARLOTTE — Hurricane Dorian pounded both Carolinas Thursday with winds and rain, proving experts wrong after days of forecasts predicting the storm would slowly weaken as it reached the Outer Banks off North Carolina.

About 200,000 people were without power from Hilton Head to Charleston, S.C., Thursday morning. Dozens of roads were flooded, and watches and warnings for tornadoes, flash floods and storm surge were growing north of Myrtle Beach into North Carolina.

A video tweeted by Live5News reporter Paola Tristan Arruda at 1:15 a.m. showed Charleston’s famous North Market Street had become a river through the historic downtown, as emergency lights flickered on buildings.

Tornadoes began to form on the northern edge of the storm just after dawn, including two reported in Horry County near Myrtle Beach, S.C., according to the Myrtle Beach Sun News.

Multiple tornadoes were also reported in North Carolina.

One ripped through Emerald Isle about 9 a.m., destroying multiple mobile homes, according to the National Weather Service. Another tornado touched down in Brunswick County, “leaving a trail of damage approximately 10 miles long near Calabash and Sunset Beach,” according to a release from N.C. Gov. Roy Cooper’s office.

A funnel cloud was also recorded on video about 7 a.m. in Pender County near Fire Station 18, the National Weather Service tweeted.

As the damage and flooding mounted, evening curfews were announced in multiple communities near the North Carolina coast, and a daytime curfew began noon Thursday in Southport, N.C., “until further notice,” according to the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office.

“Conditions are deteriorating and with confirmed tornadoes in the area, it is simply not safe to be out,” said Brunswick County officials on Facebook.

Coastal communities in South Carolina are expected to get 6 to 12 inches of rain Thursday, with isolated areas of 15 inches, according to the National Hurricane Center.

In North Carolina, predictions of rainfall in excess of 10 inches continued to grow Thursday, with nearly all coastal counties expected to get 10 to 15 inches of rain, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Dorian’s winds were 110 mph at near noon Thursday, a Category 2, and it was moving north at 8 mph so close to the coast that forecasters say landfall could happen at any time.

The center of the storm was 80 miles southeast of Charleston at 5 a.m. Thursday, with thunderstorms and strong winds coming ashore and moving to the west. A NOAA buoy about 45 miles southeast of Charleston reported a sustained wind of 71 mph with a gust to 83 mph around 9 a.m., said the National Hurricane Center.

Wind gusts of 68 mph were reported at Charleston International, and 69 mph gusts were recorded on Dewees Island, reported the Charleston Post & Courier.

Charleston had more than 50 road closures early Thursday, many due to flooding and others due to high winds bringing down trees and power lines, according to the city’s website.

South Carolina coastal towns just south of Myrtle Beach were seeing sustained winds at tropical storm strength — 50 mph — before dawn Thursday and gusts of nearly 60 mph.

The National Weather Service in Myrtle Beach reported gusts as high as 58 mph overnight and up to 2 inches of rain. An additional 8 inches of rain were expected for the city through the night, prompting flash flood watches until Friday morning.

In North Carolina, mandatory evacuations were in place for barrier islands. Coastal counties near the bays, coastal rivers and sounds also called for residents to evacuate near the coast.

Dorian is expected to bring deadly storm surge, flooding and tornadoes to the coast through the day Thursday as it heads toward the Outer Banks.

Forecasters have not predicted a potential area of landfall on the Carolinas, but suggest it could cross onto land at any point.

“The center of Dorian will continue to move close to the coast of South Carolina through the day, and then move near or over the coast of North Carolina tonight and Friday,” the National Hurricane Center said at 5 a.m. Friday.

Coastal flooding was expected to reach 4 to 8 feet above normal levels from the Savannah River in South Caroline north to Cape Lookout on the Outer Banks, the National Hurricane Center said.

“The surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves. Surge-related flooding depends on the how close the center of Dorian comes to the coast, and can vary greatly over short distances.”

North Carolina’s state medical examiner reported the state’s first Dorian-related death occurred Monday, when an 85-year-old Columbus County man “fell off a ladder while preparing his house for the storm.”

At least three of the 20-plus deaths attributed to the storm have involved men falling off ladders as they prepared for the storm or tried to remove trees, according to The Weather Channel. Most of the deaths occurred in the Bahamas.

©2019 The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, N.C.)

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


Updated at 1:48 p.m.

No one will be able to enter one Outer Banks county in North Carolina as Hurricane Dorian approaches.

Officials say in a news release that there'll be no access to Dare County starting at 8 p.m. Thursday. In addition, curfews begin in most of the county at 8 p.m. and continue until at least noon Friday. No curfew is in effect in Kitty Hawk.

Dare County officials estimate that storm surge from ocean and sound side flooding is estimated at 4 to 7 feet above ground, not including wave action. The National Weather Service forecasts periods of rapid water rise from the sound side as the storm passes, possibly into Friday evening.

Dare County is under both a hurricane warning and a storm surge warning.


Updated at 1:12 p.m.

CHARLOTTE — North Carolinians were warned to find shelter and stay there Thursday, as Category 3 Hurricane Dorian brought flooding and tornadoes to coastal areas.

"The message this morning is: Get to safety and stay there. Don't let your guard down," Gov. Roy Cooper said in a news conference.

"This won't be a brush by, whether it comes ashore or not. The eye of the storm will be close enough to cause extensive damage in North Carolina. Conditions in eastern North Carolina are deteriorating rapidly," he said.

A tornado touched down in Brunswick County early Thursday and caused extensive damage to The Farm community, ripping roofs off multiple homes.

A water spout was also photographed off Emerald Isle on the Bogue Banks, and a funnel cloud was recorded near a fire station in Pender County, according to the National Weather Service.

Cooper noted sustained winds of 100 mph with gusts of up to 125 were expected, with storm surge as high as 7 feet.

"Hundreds of thousands will lose power, and that has already begun," he said. "Winds will topple trees and power lines, and roads and buildings will be flooded.

More than 200,000 people were without power in South Carolina Thursday, officials said.

Hurricane Dorian was a Category 2 hurricane with 110 mph sustained winds at noon Wednesday, as it moved north at 8 mph.

Predictions of rainfall in excess of 10 inches continued to grow over night, with nearly all coastal counties in North Carolina expected to get 10 to 15 inches of rain, according to the National Hurricane Center.

As damage and flooding spread, the town of Southport in coastal Brunswick County declared a curfew starting at noon Thursday and the Brunswick County Sheriff's Office encouraged people in other areas not to leave their homes.

"Conditions are deteriorating and with confirmed tornadoes in the area, it is simply not safe to be out," said a Facebook post from the Brunswick County Sheriff's office.

Gusts of 70 mph were reported in South Carolina Thursday as the storm's eye came within 80 miles of Charleston.

North Carolina officials reported the state's first Dorian-related death occurred Monday, when an 85-year-old Columbus County man "fell off a ladder while preparing his house for the storm."

At least three of the 20-plus deaths attributed to Dorian involved men falling off ladders as they prepared for the storm or removed trees, according to the Weather Channel. Most of the deaths occurred in the Bahamas.

Mandatory evacuations of barrier islands began Wednesday and coastal counties near the bays, coastal rivers and sounds have also called for residents to evacuate near the coast.

State officials have mobilized nearly 400 North Carolina National Guard soldiers in armories across the state and deployed water rescue teams close to the coast in anticipation of emergencies.


Updated at 12:08 p.m.

A North Carolina beach town is reporting damage from a tornado that was spun off as Hurricane Dorian approaches.

Emerald Isle said in a news release on its website that the waterspout touched down around 9 a.m. Thursday. More than a dozen campers were knocked on their side, their metal skin mangled and twisted. Some were flipped upside-down, with their tires now aimed toward the sky. A blue beach chair was left dangling, suspended in the wires that held up a power line. Other power lines were downed across a parking lot, where trash was strewn everywhere.

Other tornadoes spun off by Dorian's outer bands struck other areas along the coast.

By late morning, heavy rain was falling sideways, trees were bending and traffic lights were swaying as Emerald Isle hunkered down again. The city was ground zero in 1996's Hurricane Fran, which was the last major hurricane to make landfall in North Carolina. Emerald Isle also weathered Hurricane Florence in 2018 and a half-dozen other hurricanes in between.


Updated at 11:55 a.m.

A tornado ripped through a mobile home park around 9 a.m. on Thursday on Emerald Isle, according to a National Weather Service tweet.


Updated at 11:43 a.m. 

Homes in Calabash, N.C., were damaged due to a possible tornado produced by Hurricane Dorian, according to WMBF. Calabash sits along the border of South Carolina in Brunswick County.


A slew of possible tornadoes touched down in Little River following several tornado warnings stemming from Hurricane Dorian, according to the National Weather Service.

Early morning reports show a tornado touched down in the Retreat and River Hills communities, with destruction including downed trees, wind damage to a home and a car that was pushed into a possible utility box.

A "minor tornado" also appears to have touched down at 901 Westport in North Myrtle Beach, according to City Spokesperson Pat Dowling. No injuries have been reported but there is roof damage. Electric is being pulled and people are are being sent to shelters, Dowling said.

The National Weather Service in Wilmington, North Carolina, has issued multiple tornado warnings for the Myrtle Beach area. About 6:50 a.m., tornado warnings were issued in North Myrtle Beach and Atlantic Beach until 7:15 a.m.

___

(c)2019 The Sun News (Myrtle Beach, S.C.)

Visit The Sun News (Myrtle Beach, S.C.) at www.thesunnews.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


Updated at 11:23 a.m.

Apartment complex in North Myrtle Beach was damaged by a possible tornado, according to WSOC.


Updated at 10:55 a.m.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper warned residents that extensive damage is expected at the coast regardless of whether Hurricane Dorian makes landfall.

Cooper said Thursday morning at a news conference that the approaching storm "is serious and can be deadly." He urged people to "get to safety and stay there."

The governor already ordered a mandatory evacuation of the state's fragile barrier islands, although people can't be forced to leave their homes. More than 1,000 people already are in over 50 shelters.

He says the storm spawned an apparent tornado early Thursday in Brunswick County that caused some damage.

Cooper says forecasts show up to 10 inches of rain and possibly more falling in coastal areas with sustained winds of 100 mph. He anticipates hundreds of thousands of people will lose power with fallen trees.


As Hurricane Dorian blows off the coast of the Carolinas, forecasters are predicting high storm surges and drenching rains that could trigger flooding and unleash environmental hazards in areas still recovering from last year's Hurricane Florence.

The National Weather Service said hurricane warnings were in effect Thursday for the Carolina coasts up to Virginia, with a "potentially life threatening storm surge" of up to 8 feet around the North Carolina-South Carolina line. Coupled with high tide, the storm's arrival Thursday is expected to push water up the mouths of coastal rivers, causing low-lying areas to flood. There could also be up to a foot of rainfall across much of Eastern North Carolina, raising concerns of flash flooding well inland.

Some areas in the region expected to be affected by Dorian are still rebuilding from Florence, which caused widespread damage in September 2018 that included scores of flooded hog and chicken farms, inundated sewage treatment plants and breached dam at a power plant near a coal ash landfill.

Dorian's eye was skirting the coast, potentially making landfall before brushing past Cape Hatteras. It was shaping up to be a more glancing blow than Florence, which slowly moved inland a year ago, dumping record-shattering rains of more than 2 feet (0.6 meters) in places.

Jen Kendrick, spokeswoman for the N.C. Pork Council, said the members of her organization are well positioned to weather Dorian after a relatively dry summer.

"Farmers in North Carolina have seen about 20 hurricanes in the past two decades and have learned much about preparation and readiness," Kendrick said.

Those preparations include relocating animals from flood-prone farms, stocking up on livestock feed in case roads are flooded and filling up the fuel tanks for the generators used to keep pumps going in the event of power outages.

Duke Energy said Wednesday that it had completed extensive repairs to the dam that breached during Florence at the L.V. Sutton Power Station near Wilmington, North Carolina. The company said it had also competed excavation of a large coal ash dump that flooded last year, removing the gray ash containing toxic heavy metals to a landfill on higher ground covered with an artificial turf cap designed to repeal rainwater.

Though part of that landfill is still under construction, Duke spokeswoman Paige Sheehan said they were not expecting any problems from Dorian at the Sutton site.

"We feel very well prepared for this storm," Sheehan said.

Duke also operates the Brunswick Nuclear Plant near the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The company said it will safely shut down the plant's twin nuclear reactors at least two hours prior to the arrival of any hurricane force winds.

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