Currant Scones

Currant Scones

If it’s not broken, then don’t fix it. This pertains to great recipes, baking techniques and, more specifically, these scones. I discovered this recipe years ago, published by Cooks Illustrated/America’s Test Kitchen, and it’s a keeper. Since then, I have made these scones countless times with only the tiniest of tweaks. And, like any tradition worth repeating, these dense, moist and crumbly scones have become a part of our breakfast rotation when the family is gathered together over the holidays, when it’s a wintry day outside, or we are expecting friends for brunch.

The technique is specific — namely, all ingredients should be as cold as possible. And while the method has steps that dance around this requirement, the good news is that the scones can be formed and cut, and then frozen in advance of baking. Simply pop them into zipper bags and freeze for up to one month. The morning of serving, remove the scones from the freezer and bake them frozen, adding an additional five minutes or so for baking to compensate for their chilliness.

The original recipe calls for blueberries, which are a lovely springtime addition. I am partial to currants, so often add them instead, along with a generous sprinkle of lemon zest.

Lynda Balslev is the co-author of “Almonds: Recipes, History, Culture” (Gibbs Smith, 2014). Contact her at TasteFood, c/o Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106, or send email to tastefood@tastefoodblog.com. Or visit the TasteFood blog at tastefoodblog.com.

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