A new fast-casual Indian restaurant has replaced the Fresh Melt grilled-cheese spot at 3894 Oxford Station Way, at the intersection with Hanes Mall Boulevard.

Jay Patel and his wife, Rimple, opened Curryfic on Nov. 20.

“You say it just like ‘terrific,’” Jay Patel said.

Patel, 52, is of Indian descent and has lived in Winston-Salem about 15 years, where has a hotel consulting business. About a year and a half ago, he took over Fresh Melt, a gourmet grilled-cheese restaurant, from original owners Andy Baer and Rob Seltzer. After working to tweak the concept, Patel decided to try something new.

“Fresh Melt was a good brand, but it just wasn’t working here,” he said. “I think millennials and other people know a lot more about cuisine, and their palates have changed, so I think they’re ready for something like this. Winston-Salem is behind Greensboro but it is catching up.”

The restaurant seats 48 inside plus a few more on a patio. It is open for lunch seven days a week and dinner every day but Monday.

Curryfic customers order at the counter, but staff members deliver food to the tables and booths. “Our goal is a maximum of eight minutes” to fill orders, Patel said.

The menu offers primarily rice bowls and wraps. In each case, customers can mix and match the type of rice (pilaf or white basmati), protein and sauce. As with most Indian menus, there are plenty of vegetarian options.

Wraps ($8.49 to $13.99) are available in roti, wheat or sundried tomato, can be filled with lamb, chicken, beef, shrimp, paneer tikka or mixed vegetables. Customers can choose three sauces: tikka (rich, creamy, tandoori-style), tangy lemon or sweet and mild tawa.

A beef wrap was large and filled with rice, slaw, peppers and onions as well as beef and sauce.

Vegetarian bowls ($7.49 to $8.49) include chana masala, daal (yellow lentil), paneer tikka and mixed vegetables. Each comes with choice of rice and naan or roti.

Other bowls are available with chicken, shrimp, beef or lamb ($8.49 to $13.99).

All of the bowls come with a choice of four tomato-based sauces: tangy curry, sweet and mild korma, rich and creamy and buttery makhni.

Customers can request any dish to be made mild or spicy.

Curryfic has such appetizers or snacks as samosas ($2.49 for 3), samosa chaat (with chana masala), and chicken tikka ($5.49). There are a few salads and such desserts as gulab jamun (doughy fried milk-solid balls soaked in syrup).

The kid’s menu includes chicken and rice, naan pizza, mac ’n’ cheese and chicken meatball with fries.

In addition to sodas and tea, the restaurant sells mango lassi. It does not sell alcohol.

Patel said that he and his wife are working from family recipes. Though sauces and proteins are cooked ahead to ensure fast service, “everything is like homemade,” he said.

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mhastings@wsjournal.com

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@mhastingsWSJ

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