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Snow flurries might mix with cold rain Tuesday in the Triad

A few snow flurries might fall today in the Triad as a cold front moves into the region.

The flurries will be mixed with rain showers.

“It’s uncertain whether (the snow) will even happen or what hours late tomorrow morning it would even change over (from rain to snow),” said Barrett Smith, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Raleigh. “It’s likely there will be some type of mix of snow in with the rain, but it’s going to be mostly rain.”

A strong cold front will move into North Carolina on Tuesday morning, dropping temperatures to the upper teens to the mid-20s, the weather service said.

No accumulation of snow is expected Tuesday in Forsyth and Guilford counties, Smith said.

Today’s forecast calls for temperatures to fall to around 39 degrees by 2 p.m. with a 90% chance of rain. Wind speeds will range from 7 to 13 mph with gusts as high as 24 mph.

The Triad could receive 1/2 to 3/4 inches of rain, the weather service said.

The low tonight will be around 20 degrees with wind chills as low as 13 degrees, the weather service said. Wind speeds will range between 7 to 11 mph with gust reach 21 mph.

The weather service has issued a winter weather advisory for Ashe, Alleghany and Watauga counties. The advisory will be in effect from 4 a.m. today to 7 a.m. Wednesday.

The cold front will produce 1 to 2 inches of snow in the higher elevations of the mountains in Northwest North Carolina, said Mike Sporer, a weather-service meteorologist in Blacksburg, Va. Other areas in the region will get a trace amount of snow, he said.

Winds will gust to 45 to 50 mph in Ashe, Alleghany and Watauga counties with wind chills lower than 5 degrees below 0 at higher elevations, the weather service said.

The roads will be slippery, and strong winds could topple tree branches, the weather service said. The wind chills could result in hypothermia if people don’t take precautions.

Snow flurries mixed with rain are possible Tuesday in northwestern counties that border Virginia, such as Surry and Stokes, said Tyler Roys, a meteorologist with Accuweather in State College, Pa.

Today’s forecast in Surry and Watauga counties calls for a 70% to 90% chance of rain and snow in Mount Airy and snow in Boone. Temperatures will fall to around 31 degrees in Surry County and to around 20 degrees in Watauga County.

Little to no snow accumulation is expected in Mount Airy, the weather service said. Less than 1 inch of snow is possible in Boone.

Lows tonight will range from 21 degrees in Surry County to 14 degrees in Watauga County.

Wind speeds will range 5 to 18 mph with gusts as high as 20 mph in Mount Airy to 44 mph in Boone, the weather service said.


Columnists
A glimpse at life for troops in Vietnam to be found in Winston-Salem man's book

There was no parade. No fireworks or flyovers, either. It was technically a book signing, a dozen or so people gathered on a pleasant Sunday afternoon near the teen fiction section in Bookmarks.

But as Veterans Day observations and remembrances go, this small event had traction. It made you think.

Martin Tucker, a teacher at Summit School and award-winning photographer, had just driven in from Elizabeth City to talk about his book, “Vietnam Photographs From North Carolina Veterans — The Memories They Brought Home.

And the crowd, though small in number, paid close attention as Tucker told the story about how an unlikely series of events resulted from an academic exercise in a visual book told through the eyes — and camera lenses — of soldiers who served in Vietnam.

“This is not from ABC or the nightly news,” Tucker said. “It was from the guy who lived out in Pfafftown.”

Classroom project

Tucker had put in a Saturday appearance at the Museum of the Albemarle, and had a talk/book signing scheduled for Bookmarks later Sunday afternoon.

So he was driving, a captive audience of one, and already thinking about the book when his phone rang. He’s told the story about the project many times, but he was more than happy to go over it once more.

“It didn’t start out as an idea about a book,” Tucker said. “It really is amazing nobody else thought of it before.”

“It” was his central premise — showing the photographs taken by young soldiers — their memories — halfway around the world in Vietnam.

Snapshots, both in black-and-white and color, popped off by young men barely removed from high school carrying rifles and portable cameras around their necks and in their rucksacks.

The project started in 2003 as a classroom exercise. Tucker, a Vietnam-era veteran who served in the Navy, was teaching photography classes at the Sawtooth Center for Visual Art when he got the idea to see if any veterans had old negatives that students could use to practice making prints in an old-fashioned darkroom.

“I’d seen beautiful black-and-white photographs of flowers and landscapes and mountain ranges,” he said. “But nothing really that told a story or made you want to look at it for a long period of time.”

He put up a few flyers around town and waited to hear back. The general answer that rolled in about three weeks later: Not many veterans had negatives. But nearly all of them had photos they’d taken themselves that they wanted to show him.

“The pictures were just amazing,” Tucker said. “And shot by 18 and 19-year-old boys. They were all cropped, taken at the decisive moment, framed just the right way … all of the things we talk about in photography classes, they just did.”

Old soldiers brought their photos in albums, boxes and bags. Tucker looked through them and kept a journal about the subject matter and who took them.

While doing so, the proverbial lightbulb moment struck. Instead of a simple classroom project that would have resulted in what Tucker calls a “bulletin board display,” the photos deserved an entire exhibit.

He estimates that he looked at some 2,500 photos, scanned perhaps 400 “maybes” and set about scrounging for a little financial backing to get it off the ground. “We raised just enough money for frames and to have mats cut,” he said.

Tucker pared those 400 to 60, and set up in 2004 the exhibition, which was called “A Thousand Words: Photographs by Vietnam Veterans.”

“You know what you’ve seen before and what would push the story ahead,” he said of the whittling process. “There were a lot of glancers. But once in a while, one of them would just pop up that would make you think, ‘That should have been on the cover of Time.’”

A tour and a book

Plenty of very talented photographers shot plenty of outstanding pictures in Vietnam.

Haunting images — one of a young Vietnamese girl running from a napalm attack and another showing the point-blank execution of a Viet Cong soldier during the Tet Offensive — captured plenty of attention and influenced public opinion.

But nobody thought about displaying photographs shot by the soldiers themselves. And once his exhibition was unveiled, things really took off.

“There was a boatload of press,” he said. A story on NPR was carried nationwide. “People started calling from as far away as Washington state and Florida asking ‘Is it going to travel?’”

He hadn’t thought about it, but the more he did, the more it made sense. Tucker said he managed to borrow five wooden crates from SECCA and the exhibit went mobile.

Then somebody from the N.C. Museum of History called. They wanted the exhibit — for a year. It was on display for four, from 2005 through 2009.

From there came the unlikeliest turn of all, a book deal in 2017, after someone at the museum put Tucker in touch with the right publisher.

“Vietnam Photographs From North Carolina Veterans” was published in August, and Tucker’s been on the go many weekends since.

“I’m not salesman,” he said at Bookmarks Sunday. “I’m not trying to sell books. That’s not the point. This is just a look inside of what they (veterans) wanted to show us.

“It just took off and after a while, all I did was try and keep it between the lines.”


Z-no-digital
Burr refrains from offering opinion on impeachment

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr (left), R-N.C., and U.S. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., share a laugh during a discussion at Wake Forest University on Monday.

The stage is set for President Donald Trump’s impeachment, U.S Sen. Richard Burr said Monday during an appearance at Wake Forest University, but Burr refrained from predicting the outcome of the impeachment proceedings. Burr, a Winston-Salem native, and U.S. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., spoke about impeachment and other issues during their visit Monday to Broyhill Auditorium in Farrell Hall at Wake Forest. Burr is the chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and Warner is the committee’s ranking Democratic member. “They (the U.S. House) are going to send down something,” Burr told a group of about 400 people who filled the auditorium for the event. “The bar for impeachment is extremely high. The test we’re going to have will be, does it reach the level for removal from office.” The House will hold public hearings beginning this week in Washington about allegations that Trump sought to condition American aid to Ukraine on that country’s investigation of a company linked to the son of his Democratic rival Joe Biden. Democratic leaders say Trump’s behavior rises to an impeachable offense, while some Republican House leaders say Trump may have acted inappropriately, but his actions doesn’t rise to an impeachable offense. “The likelihood is that he (Warner) and I will be jurors,” Burr said. In 1998, Burr was among the Republican House members who voted to impeach President Bill Clinton for lying about his affair with Monica Lewinsky. Clinton was then acquitted by the Senate. “I’ve been through impeachment,” Burr said. “Nobody wins. … No party wins. The American people don’t win.” Burr pointed to an episode during the 2016 presidential campaign in which Trump was heard on an old “Access Hollywood” tape talking about women letting him grope them and trying to have sex with them. “That did not rise to a threshold that people thought he was unqualified to be president,” Burr said. The Senate will be in session for at least six consecutive days if there is an impeachment trial, Burr said. During the trial, the senators are not allowed to make public statements about the case. Democratic House members will serve as prosecutors, and Trump’s lawyers will be his defense attorneys, Burr said. Chief Justice John Roberts of the U.S. Supreme Court will preside over the trial. “We basically hear the case and come to a verdict,” Burr said. Warner said the impeachment inquiry will force the senators and the U.S. residents to make judgments. Warner added that he is upset some of his fellow senators have made public statements regarding Trump’s guilt or innocence. He didn’t identify any senators by name, but U.S. Sen. Lindsay Graham has said that Trump did nothing wrong. “We need to take a deep breath and step back,” Warner said. “The Senate has a constitutional responsibility. This is a serious obligation. “We should be doing this with a sense of sobriety and seriousness,” Warner said. After the event, Toni Petersen of Winston-Salem said that Burr, like other Republican senators, has declined to make public statements about the impeachment inquiry because they might serve as jurors in the case. “I think they are right,” Petersen said. “As jurors, they should not be talking about it.”

By John Hinton

Winston-Salem Journal

The stage is set for President Donald Trump’s impeachment, U.S Sen. Richard Burr said Monday during an appearance at Wake Forest University, but Burr refrained from predicting the outcome of the impeachment proceedings.

Burr, a Winston-Salem native, and U.S. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., spoke about impeachment and other issues during their visit Monday to Broyhill Auditorium in Farrell Hall at Wake Forest. Burr is the chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and Warner is the committee’s ranking Democratic member.

“They (the U.S. House) are going to send down something,” Burr told a group of about 400 people who filled the auditorium for the event. “The bar for impeachment is extremely high. The test we’re going to have will be — does it reach the level for removal from office.”

The House will hold public hearings beginning this week in Washington about Trump’s actions to have Ukraine investigate a company linked to the son of his Democratic rival Joe Biden. Democratic leaders say Trump’s behavior rises is an impeachable offense while some Republican House leaders say Trump may have acted inappropriately, but his actions doesn’t rise to an impeachable offense.

“The likelihood is that he (Warner) and I will be jurors,” Burr said.

In 1998, Burr was among the Republican House members who voted to impeach President Bill Clinton for lying about his affair with Monica Lewinsky. Clinton was then acquitted by the Senate.

“I’ve been through impeachment,” Burr said. “Nobody wins … No party wins. The American people don’t win.”

Burr pointed to an episode during the 2016 presidential campaign in which Trump was heard on an old “Access Hollywood” tape talking about groping women and trying to have sex with them.

“That did not rise to a threshold that people thought he was unqualified to be president,” Burr said.

The Senate will be in session for at least six consecutive days if there is an impeachment trial, Burr said. During the trial, the senators are not allowed to make public statements about the case.

Democratic House members will serve as prosecutors, and Trump’s lawyers will be his defense attorneys, Burr said. Chief Justice John Roberts of the U.S. Supreme Court will preside over the trial.

“We basically hear the case and come to a verdict,” Burr said.

Warner said the impeachment inquiry will force the senators and the U.S. residents to make judgments.

Warner added that he is upset some of his fellow senators have made public statements regarding Trump’s guilt or innocence. He didn’t identify any senators by name, but U.S. Sen. Lindsay Graham has said that Trump did nothing wrong.

“We need to take a deep breath and step back,” Warner said. “The Senate has a constitutional responsibility. This is a serious obligation.

“We should be doing this with a sense of sobriety and seriousness,” Warner said.

After the event, Toni Petersen of Winston-Salem said that Burr, like other Republican senators, has declined to make public statements about the impeachment inquiry because they might serve as jurors in the case.

“I think they are right,” Petersen said. “As jurors, they should not be talking about it.”

jhinton@wsjournal.com

336-727-7299

@jhintonWSJ

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//gso-tcms/tcms_purged/triad_local/Adobe%20InDesign%20Documents/WSJ_WSJ/12/A/Images/WSJ_WSJ_A_001_2019_11_12_/5a4b498c-04fd-11ea-b766-00163ec2aa77/5a4b498c-04fd-11ea-b766-00163ec2aa77.jpgAndrew Dye/Journal

Kami Chavis, professor of law and director of the Criminal Justice Program at Wake Forest University School of Law, moderates a discussion between Burr and Warner. About 400 people turned out for the event.

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Wake Forest University President Nathan Hatch thanks U.S. Sen Richard Burr, R-N.C., and U.S. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., after a discussion at Wake Forest University on Monday, Nov. 11, 2019 in Winston-Salem, N.C. (Winston-Salem Journal/Andrew Dye) 20191112w_nws_burr

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Woody Marshall/BH MEDIA  

Doc Braun (right), a combat medic in the invasion of Grenada, stands at ease as he listens to the presentation of the national anthem during the Veterans Day ceremony at the Carolina Field of Honor at One Triad Park in Colfax on Monday.