One of the big choices and splurges for a wedding is often the wedding cake or desserts. But gone are the days of the traditional wedding cake; there are so many things to choose from. Local bakers share upcoming trends, some unique options, and their advice on choosing a wedding dessert.

Traditional cake options have become the foundation for over-the-top creations, many of which include elaborate toppings and out-of-the-box shapes. Today, groom’s cakes have taken over as a popular trend, which stray away from the feminine notion generally associated with traditional wedding cakes.

“Groom’s cakes are such a fun addition to the wedding celebration. I have a cornhole groom’s cake coming up where they will toss hand pies into the hole,” says Jeanne Scott, owner and artist at Artsy Cakesy. “I love making crazy things that taste wonderful.”

Other wedding dessert vendors have begun incorporating additional baked goods and treats on top of a standard wedding cake. At Savor the Moment Bakery, unique creations like this are par for the course.

“Last year, we designed a whimsical naked wedding cake with colorful flowers, macarons, truffles, and popcorn,” says Tanya Dickens, owner of Savor the Moment Bakery. “But couples are choosing colored cakes over traditional white symmetrically stacked cakes. Instead, they’re choosing sculpted avant-garde designs.”

A lot of soon-to-be-newlyweds, though, are opting for other desserts entirely. Instead of a traditional tiered cake, couples are now featuring hand-held delicacies such as macarons, handpies, and cookies. Sometimes, inspiration can be easy to find.

“I always go back to my roots when offering desserts; Latin desserts and Mediterranean are my specialty. Tres leches are one of those,” says Danielle Kattan, owner of Danielle Kattan Cakes. “Go back to your childhood, remember what made you happy. Most likely it will be a dessert prepared by your grandma or mom, so why not share it with your friends on your special day?”

This approach has been extremely popular in the Triad, as many brides are opting for something other than cake.

“We have seen brides include pies as part of their dessert tables, regardless of the season. It has been exciting to see couples step away from a traditional tiered cake idea and offer a variety of pies instead,” says Shannon Barbee, event coordinator at Maxie B’s Bakery & Dessert Cafe.

Creativity is encouraged when picking out a wedding dessert.

“Don’t let tradition stifle your creativity. Your wedding should uniquely reflect your style and taste, so if you don’t want a traditional cake or you don’t want a cake at all, that’s your choice,” says Dickens. “You can do a dessert bar, instead, with a variety of your favorite treats.”

Michelle Spell of Ava’s Cupcakes agrees.

“Go with what you love and don’t settle for the ‘safe’ option if it’s not truly what you love,” Spell, the bakery owner, says.

This spring, though, Shannon Barbee predicates that many of the trends are likely to center on Pantone’s Color the Year: Classic Blue. Jeanne Scott agreeswith her.

“We will be seeing a lot of blues, blush with greens,” she says.

2020 Pantone Color of the Year

Pantone, provider of professional color language standards, announced the 2020 Pantone Color of the Year as Classic Blue, the first multi-sensory color in the company’s history. As Laurie Pressman, vice president of the Pantone Color Institute says, “it’s a color that anticipates what’s going to happen next.”

The color’s presence itself has been defined as “instilling calm, confidence, and connection.”

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