The number of Winston-Salem area homeowners late on their mortgage payments increased during April to 5.9 percent, according to a report by CoreLogic released Tuesday.

The national real-estate research firm’s report focuses on the delinquent mortgage market, defined as being at least 30 days overdue.

Winston-Salem’s metropolitan statistical area is made up of Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Stokes and Yadkin counties.

The rate was up from 5.4 percent in March, but down from 6.1 percent in April 2016.

The rate was 2.1 percent for mortgage payments more than 90 days past due, unchanged from March and from 2.4 percent a year ago.

Both figures include homes in the foreclosure pipeline.

The foreclosure rate in the Winston-Salem area was 0.6 percent in April, unchanged from a year ago.

Economists say that housing markets and lenders are benefiting from more homeowners being able to stay current on their monthly mortgage payments.

For the Greensboro-High Point MSA, the 30-day delinquency rate was 6.3 percent, up from 5.7 percent in March, but down from 6.4 percent a year ago. The delinquency rate of more than 90 days was 2.2 percent, down from 2.3 percent in March and 2.7 percent a year ago.

For the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia MSA, the 30-day delinquency rate was 5.1 percent, down from 5.5 percent a year ago. The more-than-90-day delinquency rate was 1.8 percent, down from 2.2 percent.

For the Durham-Chapel Hill MSA, the 30-day delinquency rate was 4.1 percent, down from 4.4 percent a year ago. The more-than-90-day delinquency rate was 1.7 percent, down from 2 percent from the year-earlier period.

For the Raleigh-Cary MSA, the 30-day delinquency rate was 3.7 percent, down from 3.9 percent a year ago. The more-than-90-day delinquency rate was 1.3 percent, down from 1.6 percent.

In North Carolina, the 30-day delinquency rate was 5.3 percent, down from 5.5 percent a year ago. The 90-day delinquency rate was 2 percent, down from 2.3 percent a year ago.

Frank Martell, president and chief executive of CoreLogic, said it is likely that delinquency rates “will continue to fall for some time, but at a moderating pace.”

“As we look forward, improved fundamentals provide us with a firm foundation. We must now increase our attention to carefully expand the supply of affordable housing stock and ensure that mortgage lending policies help to prudently promote first-time homeownership.”

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rcraver@wsjournal.com 336-727-7376 @rcraverWSJ

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